Russell Crowe Responds to Adam Lambert’s ‘Les Miserables’ Criticisms on Twitter

Russell Crowe on Tuesday responded to a series of tweets from American Idol runner-up Adam Lambert, who criticized Les Miserables for its live singing technique.

“I don’t disagree with Adam,” Crowe, who plays Javert in the film, tweeted. “Sure it could have been sweetened, [director Tom] Hooper wanted it raw and real. That’s how it is.”

On Dec. 30, Lambert tweeted the film suffered from “great actors PRETENDING to be singers.”

“It’s an opera. Hollywoods movie musicals treat the singing as the last priority. (Dreamgirls was good),” he continued, before praising some of the actors in the film, including Anne Hathaway.

“The industry will say ‘these actors were so brave to attempt singing this score live’ but why not cast actors who could actually sound good?”

Lambert quickly apologized for his remarks, tweeting, “I’m so glad we are all discussing this now! Look-I grew up w this musical and so my expectations are quite high. Didn’t mean to b negative.”

Les Miserables is now playing nationwide.

‘Les Miserables’s’ Amanda Seyfried Created a Strong Character Without Being a Strong Singer: ‘My Voice Does Lack Power, and a Sense of Control’ (VIDEO)

In order to give his upcoming adaptation of the stage musical Les Miserables real epic sweep on the big screen, director Tom Hooper recruited some powerhouse vocalists to play key roles in the film. But Amanda Seyfried told Celebuzz that she wasn’t one of them – which ultimately helped her performance as starry-eyed ingénue Cosette.

“I think the fact that my voice does lack power, and a sense of control really worked with Cosette,” Seyfried said. “She’s very delicate. I do love to sing [and] I do have those qualities — I am a soprano, I am comfortable living in that range, and thankfully [the filmmakers] felt that they correlated with one another.”

Seyfried stars in the film alongside Anne Hathaway, Hugh Jackman, and former Les Mis stage actress Samantha Barks, all of whom contributed considerable muscle in their roles. She said that she threw herself into the preparation, although she admits she didn’t do quite as much as she would have liked.

“I didn’t have as much preparation as I would have loved, but I was also working on something entirely different,” Seyfried said. “So I did exercise as much as possible.”

Nevertheless, Seyfried said that even though the vulnerability of her voice proved to be an asset, she hopes one day to be able to hold her own on some of the meatier material her co-stars performed.

“It came to my advantage that I didn’t have the power that Sam has and Annie has, but I’d like to one day be able to sing ‘I Dreamed a Dream,’ if just for myself.”

Les Miserables open in theaters nationwide on December 25. Watch Celebuzz’ exclusive interview with Anne Hathaway about her work on the film below.

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‘Les Miserables’: The Reviews Are in

Director Tom Hooper returns with an epic yet equally intimate follow-up to The King’s Speech in this sprawling, grand and gritty adaptation of the celebrated Les Miserables stage musical.

Bold period-piece filmmaking paired with live musical performances – the actors sang their songs directly to camera versus pre-recording – the adaptation is certainly rich in ambition, but do the high notes soar high enough?

Have Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe and Anne Hathaway all already locked up their Oscar nominations?

Check out a cross section of reviews from around the web…

Todd Gilchrist, Celebuzz

“[Tom] Hooper’s previous effort was the Oscar-winning The King’s Speech, which netted him a Best Director statuette, as well as (apparently) an inflated sense of self-importance. But critically, that win did not supply him with the ability to parse between the heavy and the light, the important and unimportant, in a musical which is filled from start to finish with incredibly impassioned singing. There simply have to be some lesser moments in the film – and more importantly, some in the musical which are removed for pacing, redundancy, etc. – but Hooper treats every number, every reprise as the same sort of showstopper as the true centerpieces.”

Justin Chang, Variety

“As a faithful rendering of a justly beloved musical, Les Miserables will more than satisfy the show’s legions of fans. Even so, director Tom Hooper and the producers have taken a number of artistic liberties with this lavish bigscreen interpretation…For all its expected highs, the adaptation has been managed with more gusto than grace; at the end of the day, this impassioned epic too often topples beneath the weight of its own grandiosity.”

Todd McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter

“Almost any great musical one can think of features sequences shot in different ways, depending upon the nature of the music and the dramatic moment; for Hooper, all musical numbers warrant the same monotonous approach of shoving the camera right in the performer’s face; any closer and their breath would fog the lens, as, in this instance, the actors commendably sang live during the shooting, rather than being prerecorded.”

Jordan Hoffman, ScreenCrush

“If you are a fan of this show, you’ll likely lose your mind at this film. If you merely like the story, there is an ineffable quality to Hugh Jackman’s performance that just about makes suffering through the singing worth it. Les Miserables is a complete night out, not a movie to merely catch. It demands and is worthy of your attention and even if you kinda can’t stand the form (and I put myself in this category) you deny its high notes at your own peril.”

Germain Lussier, SlashFilm

“Throughout, the film is bold, brash yet intimate and emotional thanks in large part to the actors giving brave, heartbreaking performances. No one else in Hollywood could have played Valjean like Jackman does. He’s simultaneously sympathetic, masculine, intimidating and kind. Plus, he can sing incredibly well. Russell Crowe’s more stoic performance and voice make for a frightening, but welcome foil to Valjean.”

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‘Les Miserables’: Great Anne Hathaway, Hugh Jackman Performances Can’t Save an Overlong, Overwrought Stage Adaptation (MOVIE REVIEW)

First things first: Anne Hathaway probably deserves an Academy Award for her performance in Les Miserables.

Given how much she throws herself into the role of Fantine, the beleaguered mother who resorts to prostitution and hair-selling to make ends meet, she certainly seems to want one.

But then again, the entirety of the big-screen adaptation of the classic stage musical seems so aggressively overwrought, so go-for-broke in its intensity, that the whole thing practically screams “OSCAR DARLING,” even as the din of its ambition turns the whole production into a maudlin act of white-noise desperation, underscored by director Tom Hooper’s inability to discern the difference between quiet and loud – not just musically, but as a storyteller and dramatist.

Hugh Jackman (Real Steel) stars as Jean Valjean, a prisoner who breaks parole after completing a 19-year prison sentence and attempts to build himself a new life as a businessman. Determined to prove that his troubled past is behind him, Valjean adopts Cosette (Amanda Seyfried), Fantine’s orphaned daughter, and raises her in affluence. But his past returns to haunt him when Javert (Russell Crowe), the policeman who once detained him, discovers his new identity and refuses to believe that the former convict has been rehabilitated.

As Javert pursues Valjean, the Parisian rebellion unfolds, and the two men find themselves caught in the midst of a much larger conflict. But as their fates are determined, Cosette falls for Marius (Eddie Redmayne) a student revolutionary, and Valjean is forced to decide which is more important – his own freedom, or the happiness and safety of his adopted daughter.

Although Russell Crowe’s voice is better suited for a rock band than a stage musical, almost all of the actors do a fairly amazing job of bringing power and passion to their voices, much less their roles. Hathaway and Jackman compete for the film’s MVP – and truthfully, Jackman probably wins just for sheer ubiquitousness – but Crowe offers a convincing (if decidedly un-theatrical) understatedness as Valjean’s pursuer, and Eddie Redmayne becomes the film’s unexpected breakout as both an effective romantic lead and formidable singer.

That said, Seyfried’s trilling soprano feels more appropriate either for a Disney musical or a chipmunk serenade than a mud-soaked period epic, and Samantha Barks lends a slightly overbearing theatricality where film allows for greater subtlety as Eponine, the jilted young woman who competes for Marius’ attention.

Hooper’s previous effort was the Oscar-winning The King’s Speech, which netted him a Best Director statuette, as well as (apparently) an inflated sense of self-importance. But critically, that win did not supply him with the ability to parse between the heavy and the light, the important and unimportant, in a musical which is filled from start to finish with incredibly impassioned singing. There simply have to be some lesser moments in the film – and more importantly, some in the musical which are removed for pacing, redundancy, etc. – but Hooper treats every number, every reprise as the same sort of showstopper as the true centerpieces.

The end result is an egregiously overlong, absurdly melodramatic and yet somehow totally underwhelming story of one guy who worries too much about whether he’s a good man, another who insists he’s bad, and the beautiful women who alternately alleviate or exacerbate these anxieties. (Unfortunately, without any greater specificity or depth.)

Film can be a wonderful medium for musicals because it allows for elaborate sets, multiple camera angles, the kinds of close-ups and detail that the tableau of a stage cannot provide, and perhaps most importantly, editing. There are many, many things that can be more easily and effectively communicated on film. But Hooper treats his frame like the stage, throwing in everything humanly possible, and then sweeping in, repeatedly to numbing effect, to emphasize and re-emphasize punctuative emotional crescendos and narrative climaxes we already understand, because Jackman or some other actor has been singing about them for the previous five minutes.

Ultimately, Les Miserablesis, still, an amazing stage play, but a decidedly lackluster movie – bloated and interminable precisely because its earnest emotions, which are themselves not a bad thing, are repeated endlessly until they become bumper-sticker ideologies rather than resounding, deeply-held beliefs. But while Hooper and his (apparent absence of an) editor is chiefly responsible for the end result’s turgid repetition, Hathaway and her co-stars should be proud of their work, which, yes, may indeed be worthy of an award or two come Oscar time.

In a film seemingly about principles, it’s the people who feel them who still prevail, making Les Miserables less a miserable failure than a misfire, writ large on a stage too big to ignore its flaws.

Les Miserables opens nationwide December 25. Watch Celebuzz‘ interview with star Anne Hathaway below.

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‘Les Miserables’ Star Anne Hathaway on Finding Her Inner Fantine: ‘In the Moment, You Cease to Exist’ (VIDEO)

Anne Hathaway has bore her body and soul in past roles to play such characters as a besieged personal assistant (The Devil Wears Prada), an ailing artist (Love and Other Drugs), and a formidably sexy cat burglar (The Dark Knight Rises).

But for her role in the new adaptation of the classic stage musical Les Miserables, Hathaway says she had to shed her skin completely, even if playing desperate mother Fantine demanded some of the most intense preparation of her career.

“There was a lot of discipline in the preparation,” Hathaway told Celebuzz. “I think we all stopped everything about our lives and focused on the task at hand, which was performing Les Mis on screen. But actually in the moment, you can’t think about any of that, because you cease to exist – it’s just about your character.”

Hathaway and her co-stars tackled the material in a way that no other movie musical has – by requiring the stars to actually sing on stage or set as they performed each scene.

She explained that in order to surmount this challenge, she developed her voice so that it could be strong enough to handle any emotion she felt when bringing the character to life.

“I needed to get my voice to a level of strength and preparedness that I could make any vocal choice at all in the moment, and know my voice would be there to support it,” Hathaway said.  “So all of the technical prep was about that.

“But in the moment, once again it was just about letting go.”

Les Miserables opens in theaters nationwide December 25, 2012. Watch the film’s theatrical trailer below.

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Anne Hathaway, Amanda Seyfried and the Cast of ‘Les Miserables’ Pose for Annie Leibovitz (PHOTOS)

Anne Hathaway, Amanda Seyfried and the main cast of Tom Hooper’s movie-musical Les Miserables recently posed for a gorgeous, if haunting, photo shoot by Annie Leibovitz, which will be featured in the upcoming December issue of Vogue.

Hathaway, who also graces the cover of the issue, looks especially frail in the photo shoot — and for good reason. The actress reportedly lost 25 pounds to play the role of Fantine, a desperate mother who turns to prostitution to make money for her daughter, Cosette.

“I had to be obsessive about it,” Hathaway, 30, told the magazine. “The idea was to look near death. Looking back on the whole experience – and I don’t judge it in any way – it was definitely a little nuts. It was definitely a break with reality, but I think that’s who Fantine is anyway.”

Hathaway — who married her longterm boyfriend Adam Shulmanin September — said at one point she lived off of eating two thin squares of dried oatmeal paste per-day to lose 15 pounds in two weeks.

Les Miserables opens Christmas Day.

For more on the photo shoot — which also features Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe and Eddie Redmayne — click through the gallery, above.

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‘Les Miserables’ New International Trailer: More Singing, More Footage, More Anne Hathaway (VIDEO)

Ah, the sweet sounds of rebellious French peasants.

Not to take anything away from Anne Hathaway’s rendition of “I Dreamed a Dream,” showcased in previous trailers for Les Miserables, but patient fans can finally bask in rest of the cast’s singing chops.

This week, Universal Pictures released the international trailer (via ComingSoon.net) for its big screen adaptation of the beloved Broadway musical. And all fans have to do is listen.

The new trailer shows every major Les Miserables cast member, including Amanda Seyfried, Eddie Redmayne, Russell Crowe, Hugh Jackman, Sacha Baron Cohen and Helena Bonham Carter.

With hints of classic  show tunes like “A Heart Full of Love” and “One Day More,” and exciting new footage, the nearly three-minute clip offers audiences worldwide a fuller-than-ever glimpse into the holiday 2012 release.

Directed by Tom Hooper (The King’s Speech), Les Miserables arrives in theaters December 25.

What do you think of the new ‘Les Miserables’ trailer? Are you looking forward to the film? Weigh in below!

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Russell Crowe Praises Obama as ‘The Future’: 14 Other Celebrities Who Support the President (GALLERY)

Another star is jumping on the Barack Obama bandwagon.

With just over two weeks until Election Day, many celebrities are throwing their Hollywood weight behind their candidate through official advertisements, fundraising events, personal endorsements, and now, Twitter.

“Villagers, I don’t endorse politicians. Not my thing. However, Obama is the light & the future,” Russell Crowe tweeted. “Keep going towards the light. Put America first.”

Though he encouraged others to support the POTUS on Nov. 6, the Australian actor won’t be much of a help to Obama at the polls — his foreigner status prohibits him from voting or even contributing to campaigns.

Nevertheless, Crowe — who reportedly split from wife of nine years, Danielle Spencer, earlier this month — made no secret of why he would chose Obama on the ballot. “Complex time for the world,” he tweeted. “America needs to continue the Global awareness that Obama has set. A healthy America means a healthy planet.”

Despite detractors calling him an “idiot” and “typical Hollywood clown” in the Twitterverse, Crowe stuck to his guns. “I’m going to leave all the abusive tweets up on my time line because I think it tells its’ own story,” Crowe later wrote. “I’m 48 years old, a tax payer and a union member. I don’t care if you don’t agree with my opinion, I’m still going to have my opinion.”

Crowe’s presidential talk comes as a bit of a surprise, given the Oscar winner’s previously stated stance on Hollywood stars broadcasting their political persuasions. “I come from a culture where, in a public forum, you don’t discuss sex, religion or politics,” Crowe told the Houston Chronicle back in 2003. “I don’t think being a celebrity gives you any right whatsoever to air your political views.”

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Rihanna and Chris Brown, Taylor Swift and Conor Kennedy: The Hottest Celeb Make-Ups and Break-Ups of October (VIDEO)

The month’s not over yet but so far, October has seen some of the most surprising hook-ups and break-ups in the world of celebrity.

From Chris Brown’s split from Karrueche Tran to his rumored reunion with Rihanna, the “Don’t Wake Me Up” singer has made plenty of relationship headlines this month.

Shortly after his break-up with Tran, Brown released a bizarre confessional video, titled “The Real Chris Brown.”

“Is there such thing as loving two people?” the 23-year-old says in the clip, over images of his two exes.

Which other couples made headlines in October?

The rumor mill has been having a field day with Taylor Swift ever since she began dating Conor Kennedy.

The latest buzz comes from Star magazine, which claims that the 22-year-old country singer was spotted kissing Conor’s cousin Patrick Schwarzenegger at a recent family gathering.

Meanwhile, actor Russell Crowe has separated from his wife of nine years, Danielle Spencer. According to an Australian paper, the Gladiator star has been coping with the split in New York, where he has been filming the biblical picture Noah.

For more October celebrity couples news, check out the video above. Which couple’s make-up or break-up are you most shocked about? Share your thoughts below.

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Russell Crowe, Danielle Spencer Divorce: Spencer’s Dad Is ‘Sad’ About Split

Russell Crowe and Danielle Spencer have kept mum about rumors of their divorce — but that hasn’t stopped Spencer’s father from talking.

In an exclusive interview with WHO, Don Spencer admits he’s “sad” the couple has parted ways after nine years of marriage, but still loves them both.

“I love them both and am naturally sad as any father would be in this situation,” he told WHO on Tuesday.

Rumors that Crowe, 48, and Spencer, 43, were divorcing first sprouted on Sunday; however speculation has been brewing as early as June, when Spencer was photographed with her Dancing With the Stars partner Damian Whitewood.

As Celebuzz reported Monday, Spencer stands to win millions from the divorce — over $25 million, according to some reports.

Crowe, who later this year will stretch his vocal chords in the movie-musical adaptation of Les Miserables, is currently stateside, filming Darren Aronofsky’s biblical epic Noah alongside Emma Watson and his A Beautiful Mind co-star Jennifer Connelly.

The couple married in 2003. They have two children — Charles, 8, and Tennyson, 6.

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Russell Crowe, Danielle Spencer Divorce: Spencer Could Receive Millions in Settlement

The impending divorce between Russell Crowe and Danielle Spencer could result in a hefty settlement for the Oscar-winning actor’s wife of nine years.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, Spencer could receive $25 million, if not more, from money Crowe earned from his high-profile movie projects and various business investments.

Also at stake is the couple’s real estate portfolio, estimated to be worth up to $50 million.

The couple — who have yet to address the reports — signed a pre-nuptial agreement, according to the Herald. The paper reports that the agreement guranteed Spencer at least $15 million provided they stayed married for at least three years.

A $3 million trust fund was also reportedly put in place for each of the couple’s sons — Charles, 8, and Tennyson, 6.

Reports of their split first hit the Internet on Sunday, though speculation has been brewing since June when Spencer was photographed out on the town with Damian Whitewood, her partner on Australia’s Dancing With the Stars.

The couple married in 2003. They met more than 20 years ago on the set of The Crossing.

Crowe, who later this year will stretch his vocal chords in the movie-musical adaptation of Les Miserables, is currently stateside, filming Darren Aronofsky’s biblical epic Noah alongside Emma Watson and his A Beautiful Mind co-star Jennifer Connelly.

Before marrying Spencer, he was previously (read: infamously) linked to Meg Ryan, whom he worked with on the ill-fated drama Proof of Life. Bad buzz surrounding the on-set affair between Crowe and Ryan (who was then married to Dennis Quaid) was blamed for the 2000 film’s lackluster box office.

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