2012 Year in Review: The 20 Biggest Weddings, Breakups and Makeups

Just like the rest of the world, love makes the Hollywood go round.

This year had no shortage of romance among the stars. From Justin Timberlake and Jessica Biel saying “I do” under the stars in Southern Italy, to Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively secretly getting hitched on a sprawling Southern plantation, many buzzed-about celebrity couples found their happily-ever-after in 2012.

Even some of the industry’s most beloved golden girls turned bridal. Natalie Portman tied the knot with her Benjamin Millepied in a traditional Jewish ceremony in Big Sur, Calif., where Anne Hathaway also walked down the aisle at sunset to wed Adam Shulman.

Drew Barrymore vowed for forever with Will Kopleman at her Montecito, Calif. estate, while Carey Mulligan took the plunge with Mumford & Sons musician Marcus Mumford in the countryside of Somerset, England.

But wedded bliss didn’t bless everyone, with many longtime lovers calling it quits in 2012. After almost seven years of marriage, Heidi Klum and Seal announced their separation in January before officially filing for divorce three months later.

Parting ways after five wedded years, Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes — long labeled Tomkat — reached a surprisingly speedy divorce settlement after just 11 days in July, with the actress receiving primary custody of the couple’s six-year-old daughter, Suri.

But not all of Hollywood’s bitter breakups stuck. Back in July, Kristen Stewart was infamously snapped smooching her married Snow White and the Huntsman director Rupert Sanders, seemingly ruining her three-year relationship with Twilight co-star Robert Pattinson. But Twihard broken hearts were soon on the mend, as Stewart and Pattinson were spotted canoodling in Los Angeles, Calif., in October.

Now, as the countdown begins to 2013, look back at this year’s biggest weddings, breakups and makeups.

Which wedding took the cake? What split was most shocking? And which makeups were meant to be? Share your thoughts in comments below.

Celebuzz Single Player No Autoplay (CORE)
No changes are to be made to this player

Kelsey Grammer Leases Beverly Hills Mansion for $30K per Month — Take a Peek Inside (PHOTOS)

Kelsey Grammer has found a new family home.

After welcoming his newborn daughter Faith with wife Kayte Walsh in July, the former Frasier star has dropped big bucks on five bedrooms, six bathrooms mansion located in the heart of Beverly Hills.

Originally designed in 1926 by renowned architect Ralph C. Flewelling, Spanish Colonial-inspired abode features boast wood-burning fireplaces, butler’s pantry with a refrigerated wine storage, maid’s quarters and a poolside guesthouse. The home also features a detached 3-car garage with a gated motor court.

How much is Grammer, 57, splashing out for this lavish manor?

According to the listing records, the home is currently going for $30,000 per month.

This summer, the former Frasier actor and his ex-wife, Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star Camille Grammer, placed their two homes on the market: a $7 million vacation estate in Beaver Creek, Colo., and an $18 million Beverly Hills home.

Camille, 44, also listed her $17.9 milliom Malibu mansion for sale in August.

What do you think of this celebrity pad? Launch the gallery to take a peek inside.

Celebuzz Single Player No Autoplay (CORE)
No changes are to be made to this player

Kelsey Grammer, Kayte Walsh Made ‘Unsafe Decision’ by Not Putting Daughter Faith in a Car Seat, Says Child Expert

Kelsey Grammer and Kayte Walsh made an “unsafe decision” when they allegedly transported their four-month-old daughter Faith from LAX without using a car seat, according to Child and Teen Development Specialist Dr. Robyn Silverman.

“I think that when people see that there’s no car seat, they have a choice to make,” Silverman told Celebuzz on Wednesday. “One choice means getting into a car and driving what is perceived as ‘unsafely’ but in their heads they believe it’s gonna be safe. Or, to take the time, which they know is gonna be a hassle, and find out where they’re gonna get a car seat.”

“I understand, as a parent, that it can be frustrating to take the long way, but in this case, the risk is just too high,” she continued. “When you’re faced with this type of decision, you really do need to pick safety over convenience.”

Silverman was referring to an incident that took place on Tuesday, in which Walsh was videotaped holding Faith on her lap as the couple’s black SUV pulled away from the curb at LAX.

Despite evidence to the contrary, a rep for Grammer later shot down all reports, insisting there was a car seat inside the SUV all along.

Whatever actually happened during the alleged incident — which, if proven to be true, would be an automatic violation of California State Law — remains unclear.

For now, Dr. Silverman says the focus should remain on the safety of the child.

“There was an accident [mentioned] in the Post — I think it was yesterday — that said a baby was thrown from a car and wasn’t in the car seat …” she said. “The baby was actually thrown from the car and is now in the hospital. It’s pretty serious when things don’t go the right way.”

“Had anything happened to [Faith], we would have been having a much different conversation.”

Grammar and Walsh, who were married in 2011, then again over the summer, were previously under fire for taking Faith to a Halloween party at the Playboy Mansion in October.

“Kayte is breast-feeding, and we do not have a nanny or a trusted babysitter at this time, so Faith goes everywhere with us,” Grammer later told the New York Daily News in response to the outcry.

To learn more about Dr. Robyn Silverman, visit her official website.

Celebuzz Single Player No Autoplay (CORE)
No changes are to be made to this player

‘Cheers’ at 30: Eight Reasons Why the Classic Sitcom Still Matters (INSIDE STORY)

A few years ago, it seemed like Cheers was one of those shows, like M*A*S*H, Seinfeld, The Simpsons, or Frasier (Cheers’ own spinoff) that was going to be a staple of late-night TV forever, its 275 episodes a permanent part of TV’s atmosphere.

Today, however, Cheers‘ place in the TV firmament seems less certain. After all, as of this weekend, it’s 30 years old (it debuted on Sept. 30, 1982). It’s not as hip in its content as the more subversive, satirical Simpsons or Seinfeld, or as cutting-edge in form as laughtrack-free mockumentary sitcoms like The Office or Modern Family. Younger viewers simply may not be aware of what a landmark Cheers was, or how it made all those other shows possible.

“Cheers was an enormous influence on comedy, and an influence very much for the positive,” Huffington Post TV critic Maureen Ryan told Celebuzz.

“It was incredibly sharp and literate and well acted. It raised the bar in terms of what comedy could be, and the best thing an aspiring TV comedy writer could do is watch that show,” she added.

Those sentiments are echoed by such accomplished comedy writers and and performers as Amy Poehler, whose current Parks and Recreation is unimaginable without the example set by Cheers. Fans of the series should visit GQ‘s website, which just posted a wonderful, epic oral history of the show, featuring recollections from nearly every star and writer. Those who aren’t yet fans, read on for eight reasons why Cheers still matters and why it still holds up 30 years later.

1. It created lasting stars. Among those made famous by Cheers are Ted Danson (currently heading the cast of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation), Kirstie Alley (currently on Dancing With the Stars), Kelsey Grammer (currently starring in Boss), Shelley Long (occasionally guest-starring as Ed O’Neill‘s ex-wife on Modern Family), and Woody Harrelson (whose recent movies include Zombieland and The Messenger, for which he earned an Oscar nomination).

Then there are others who are less household names but eternally recognizable faces, including Rhea Perlman, John Ratzenberger, Bebe Neuwirth, and George Wendt, who, for the rest of his life, will never have to pay for a drink and will be greeted with a rousing group shout of “Norm!” every time he enters a bar.

2. It was based on a brilliant, endlessly adaptable premise. There had been workplace sitcoms before Cheers, but Cheers was the first one that suggested that any ad hoc people who spent enough time in one place together, whether they worked there or not, constituted a family. That was true of Seinfeld and Friends (substitute a diner or coffeehouse for a bar), and it’s true of the extended families of The Office, Parks and Recreation and Community.

3. It created fully-rounded characters whom viewers came to regard as family members. ”What the show did was give viewers an array of characters we could care deeply about, and it also made people care about those people’s relationships with each other,” Huffington Post‘s Ryan told Celebuzz.

“This was not the standard way in which comedy operated back in the day, but it’s very present in how many of TV’s best comedies have worked in subsequent years, and I think that’s largely the influence of Cheers. Why did we care about Ross and Rachel on Friends, why do we care about the citizens of Pawnee [on Parks and Recreation]? Because Cheers provided an example of how you deepen and enrich the bond between audience and show — you tell funny jokes, sure, you entertain, but you also have a heart and a story that is going somewhere.”

4. It worked as both self-contained episodes and as a long, soapy arc. Watching any of them today, out of order on late-night TV, each Cheers episode works on its own. But Cheers also marks the beginning of primetime comedies with long-gestating storylines, with characters who grow and change over time instead of remaining static. The will-they-or-won’t-they-hook-up plotline between Sam (Danson) and Diane (Long) in the first few seasons was the model for every show since that’s tried to milk the sexual tension between its male and female leads for as long as it can, without losing the spark of conflict (and the audience’s interest) if they do finally become a couple.

“It raised the stakes in the characters’ relationships over time,” Ryan told Celebuzz. “That simply didn’t happen, for the most part, on any TV shows, but in its own stealth way, Cheers made it safe for shows to be serialized, to have people’s lives change, to have dramatic developments reverberate for months or years.”

Eventually, the notion of a serial plotline that you had to follow from the beginning was everywhere, even in unclassifiable dramas like Lost.

5. It was the model for how to replace a beloved character who leaves — twice. When Nicholas Colasanto died, his sweet-but-dimwitted Coach was replaced by a similar but younger character, Woody Boyd (Harrelson). And when Long left, Diane was replaced by a character who was her polar opposite, Alley’s Rebecca Howe. Both transitions worked remarkably well and gave the show several more years of life. In fact, it’s hard to think of another sitcom that has replaced primary cast members as gracefully — not NewsRadio, nor The Office, nor Two and a Half Men.

6. It made Thursday the most important night of the television week. Believe it or not, in the 1970s, people used to stay home and watch TV on Saturdays. CBS had an unbeatable lineup of sitcoms that included The Mary Tyler Moore Show and The Bob Newhart Show. ABC had frothy, hour-long escapist shows Love Boat and Fantasy Island. But the rise of Cheers helped make Thursday into TV’s top night Augmented later by The Cosby Show and eventually by Seinfeld, Thursday night became what NBC rightly touted as “must-see TV.”

Soon, its Thursday hits were commanding top dollar among advertisers. It didn’t hurt that Hollywod studios realized that Thursdays are when many people decide which movies to see on the weekend, making Thursdays especially lucrative for film ads. The other networks began moving their strongest shows to Thursdays to compete, making the night an ad bonanza for all of them. Still, NBC held on for a very long time, with its ’90s Thursday schedule including such mainstays as Seinfeld, Friends, and the drama ER. It’s only in the last decade or so that NBC’s Thursday dominance has slipped, though it’s still the night you can watch the network’s smartest comedies — Community, The Office, 30 Rock, and Parks and Recreation. And it’s still the most prestigious night for TV sponsors.

7. It never jumped the shark. Sure, some people prefer the Diane years over the Rebecca years, or the Coach years over the Woody years, but the quality stayed remarkably consistent over 11 seasons, thanks to the working rhythms developed by the cast (who knew their characters inside and out) and the top-notch writing staff.

“I attended a taping once,” Denver Post TV critic Joanne Ostrow recalled to Celebuzz.

“They rewrote lines on the fly, trying out various ways to make the funny jokes funnier. There they were, hitting marks, making entrances, spouting lines, writers on the side rewriting even during the taping, suggesting new lines, and it all went off like a little play,” she said.

By the time Cheers went off the air in 1993 (only because Danson was tired of doing it, and no one wanted to do the show without him), it was still one of TV’s top-rated and best-loved series. Forty million people watched the finale, an unimaginable number for any comedy now.

8. It championed a sophisticated style of writing that became a dominant style in sitcoms. Cheers punchlines were full of lofty references to highbrow culture, but placed in context so that, even if you didn’t get the reference, you’d still get the laugh. The writers didn’t talk down to the audience. Often, the writers would avoid addressing sticky topics directly, assuming that the audience would figure out what was really being said. That’s a writing style that bore fruit most clearly on Frasier (which, naturally, was staffed with writers who’d worked on Cheers), but also shows like Friends, Will & Grace (both of which depended on the light touch of Cheers director James Burrows), Seinfeld, The Office, and The Simpsons and Modern Family (both of which have included writer/producers who had worked on Cheers).

Poehler continues to study Cheers on her downtime. “It’s the only show I have on my DVR, and I watch it all the time,” she told GQ. “Not only because it’s comforting, but also because I relate to that feeling of loving the people you work with.” She added, “I hope and assume that every good comedy writer, no matter the age, has a moment where they discover how great Cheers is. And I would encourage any young person getting into comedy to sit down and watch the best television show that’s ever been on, and see the structure of it. Because their jokes were evergreen.”

 

Emmys 2012: Bryan Cranston, Betty White and 8 More Multiple Academy Award Winners (GALLERY)

When Mary Tyler Moore won an Emmy for her portrayal of Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show in 1963, she famously said, “I know this will never happen again.” She couldn’t have been more wrong. Moore is now a seven-time Emmy winner.

But she’s not the only Emmy darling to take home multiple statues. Michael J. Fox won three Emmys for his portrayal of Alex P. Keaton in Family Ties. Not to mention that Bryan Cranston has won the Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series three consecutive times for Breaking Bad. On Sunday night, he’ll be up for his fourth award.

Who else is a multiple Emmy winner? Click through the gallery above to find out.

Before Walter White entered the picture, Dennis Franz won a record-setting four Emmys during his stint on the ABC police drama NYPD Blue.

Representing TV’s leading ladies, Candice Bergen won five Emmys for her work on CBS’ Murphy Brown. She eventually took her name out of the running, giving another funny woman — Helen Hunt — a shot to take home Emmy gold. Hunt went on to win four consecutive Emmys for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series.

And who could forget golden girl Betty White? This national treasure has seven Emmys to her name — one for her iconic performance as the lovable Rose Nylund on Golden Girls.

 

Camille Grammer to Get $30 Million in Divorce Settlement From Kelsey Grammer (REPORT)

Camille Grammer has reportedly scored big in her divorce settlement from Kelsey Grammer.

After 13 years of marriage, the reality star will get $30 million in the settlement, according to TMZ. The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star will get a 50 percent cut of the couple’s property assets, which is roughly around $60 million.

But why does Camille get half of the couple’s assets? 

TMZ says that when Camille met Kelsey, the Frasier star was broke. ”Bad decisions and a drug problem nearly sent Kelsey to the poor house,” the website reported. “We’re told Camille righted the ship and managed the money to where they now have tens of millions to split.”

Camille filed for divorce in July 2010, and the couple’s bitter divorce played out while reality cameras were rolling. Kelsey, 57, reportedly had an affair with flight attendant Kayte Walsh, 31, while he was in New York for a stint on Broadway. Kelsey and Walsh married in February 2011, just two weeks after his divorce from Camille was finalized.

Meanwhile, Camille, 42, is currently dating 35-year-old bankruptcy lawyer Dimitri Charalambopoulos. ”He’s tall, 6’2″, dark, handsome,” Grammer told E! News. “He loves to cook. I call him my Greek god.”

 

Camille Grammer to Get $30 Million in Divorce Settlement From Kelsey Grammer (REPORT)

Camille Grammer has reportedly scored big in her divorce settlement from Kelsey Grammer.

After 13 years of marriage, the reality star will get $30 million in the settlement, according to TMZ. The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star will get a 50 percent cut of the couple’s property assets, which is roughly around $60 million.

But why does Camille get half of the couple’s assets? 

TMZ says that when Camille met Kelsey, the Frasier star was broke. ”Bad decisions and a drug problem nearly sent Kelsey to the poor house,” the website reported. “We’re told Camille righted the ship and managed the money to where they now have tens of millions to split.”

Camille filed for divorce in July 2010, and the couple’s bitter divorce played out while reality cameras were rolling. Kelsey, 57, reportedly had an affair with flight attendant Kayte Walsh, 31, while he was in New York for a stint on Broadway. Kelsey and Walsh married in February 2011, just two weeks after his divorce from Camille was finalized.

Meanwhile, Camille, 42, is currently dating 35-year-old bankruptcy lawyer Dimitri Charalambopoulos. ”He’s tall, 6’2″, dark, handsome,” Grammer told E! News. “He loves to cook. I call him my Greek god.”