Ryan Gosling Says After Doubting Backstreet Boys’ Success, ‘They’re Not Returning My Calls’ (VIDEO)

It’s not secret that Ryan Gosling spent a significant portion of his adolescence on The Mickey Mouse Club, singing and dancing alongside future pop stars like Justin Timberlake on the Disney Channel series.

But in an interview for his new film Gangster Squad, Gosling reveals that he doubted for the future of such pop phenomena as Backstreet Boys when a members of the band first proclaimed their inevitable success.

“When I was doing the Mickey Mouse Club, we were living in the same place as that guy A.J. from the Backstreet Boys,” Gosling tells Celebuzz. “They were just forming that band, so he was saying how big they were going to be – and he had a poster of them in his house.

 

“We were like, it’s never going to happen,” he remembers. “Didn’t they already do that with New Kids? You’re a little late. Cut to… I was wrong.”

Backstreet Boys, of course, went on to become multimillion-selling pop stars, and continue to flourish today – perhaps not coincidentally thanks to a collaboration with forbears New Kids on the Block, entitled NKOTBSB. But Gosling insists that he isn’t regretful he skipped that particular career path in lieu of his current acting career.

“You can’t live in the past,” he says. “You’ve got to live in the now. That ship has sailed.”

Nevertheless, Gosling joked that his efforts to reach out to A.J. since then failed to receive a response. “They’re not returning my calls,” he says. “I try not to think about it.”

Watch Celebuzz’ interview with Gosling above, and the film’s theatrical trailer below. And then let us know in the comments – what do you think of the idea of Baby Goose getting down on stage as a pop star?

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Weekend Movie Preview — Five Flicks in Five Clicks (PHOTOS)

If you’re anything like us, the first few weeks of the year are a tangle of renewed responsibilities, halfhearted resolutions and mostly, desperate need for more days off.

As such, it’s not just a welcome, but necessary distraction to find a movie (or two, or three) to occupy those hours not already claimed by work or a new gym membership – which is why Five Flicks in Five Clicks exists.

Celebuzz takes a look at the week’s top five films – some already successful, others eagerly anticipated – to help moviegoers make their choice when they trek out to theaters over the weekend.

Click here to launch the gallery and see Celebuzz’ breakdown of the week’s films.

Check out the trailers for the films below.

Django Unchained

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Gangster Squad

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A Haunted House

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Jack Reacher

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Texas Chainsaw 3D

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Let us know in the comments below – which of these cinematic masterpieces makes you most excited to go to the movies?

‘Gangster Squad’ Costume Designer Reveals How Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone Suited Up for the ’40s Crime Story (Q&A)

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Genetics may get all of the credit for movie stars being so darn attractive up on the screen, but truthfully, it’s costume designers who often do most of the work. And over the past two decades, Mary Zophres has helped George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Jeff Bridges among many others look their best, earning BAFTA and Academy Award nominations in the process.

Most recently, Zophres gave a glamorous sheen to Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone and Josh Brolin in Gangster Squad, a crime thriller that required her to recreate the look of the 1940s in order to bring to life the true story of a group of cops who were assigned the task of taking down one of Los Angeles’ most notorious mob bosses, Mickey Cohen.

Zophres spoke exclusively with Celebuzz about her work on the film, which involved tracking down an extensive collection of period costumes, and assembling new ones that perfectly fitted the ensemble cast, which also includes Sean Penn, Nick Nolte and Anthony Mackie. Additionally, she offered an inside look at a handful of the designs that she came up with as she created the characters’ vintage wardrobes.

Celebuzz: First of all, you did a fantastic job on the costumes in Gangster Squad. I was deeply envious watching those guys walk around in those suits.

Mary Zophres: Well you can do it. I mean, totally. Do you live in L.A.?

CB: Yes, I do.

MZ: There’s a great vintage clothing store called Play Clothes that is on Magnolia, and she has some ’40s suits, a lot of ’50s suits there and they will totally fit you up if you’re in to it. Or take a suit in your closet and just make sure it fits or if you don’t have one, it’s tailoring. That’s the difference between looking good and looking a little shlubby.

CB: Where do you usually start when you are researching something that demands the kind of period detail that Gangster Squad does?

MZ: I start every movie I do, but particularly a movie like a period film, I start doing research. Because it’s based on a true story, there was a lot of visual research on Mickey Cohen and even the gangster squad because there really was a John O’Mara, the character that Brolin plays, there really was a Frank Whalen. [But] we got lots of photos of police detectives from that time period and I looked at a lot of magazines because there’s so many nightclub scenes. And in those days there was magazines called like Photoplay, for instance, and I got like a year or two straight of Photoplay, where you can see candid photos of people out and about, and just to get the feeling of like what people in Los Angeles were looking like and what they were wearing to these nightclubs. We also got movies of people walking in downtown L.A. So we could watch those just to let it sink in, “this is how people looked and dressed in every day life in Los Angeles.” So to make a long story short, [I do] tons of research – a lot of it out of Western Costume; they have a great research library, some of it just online. And then you kind of get ideas, like I based Anthony Mackie‘s character on Jackie Robinson because I couldn’t find any African American detectives in that time period, to be honest with you. Like we took a little bit of license there. So Jackie Robinson, for instance, was an inspiration and there were plenty of research photos on him and you just kind of pick around.

CB: What or who was the inspiration for Emma Stone’s character?

MZ: Emma was a sort of a made-up character, her character Grace Faraday. But I looked to Rita Hayworth and I wanted her to have that sexuality. I mean, she was like Mickey Cohen’s arm candy basically, and so I talked to [director Ruben Flesicher], and he was like, ‘I want her to evoke Rita Hayworth and Lauren Bacall and Gene Tierney.’ So by the time I finish doing my research, I know the script inside and out, and so then it’s just like that’s your reality. I didn’t even look at any other time period piece of clothing or a magazine or anything the whole time I was on Gangster Squad because this was my thing.

CB: Men now are kind of built a little differently than men were then, at least in terms of the way they wore their clothes. How much tailoring did you have to do to suit the actors who were in this film or even just what we perceive as style now as opposed to what was fashionable then?

MZ: Well, the men’s suit back then is different than it is now. A very fashion-forward suit nowadays is shorter — it comes up on a high hip on a man and is more tapered in the leg. It’s a flat front; it has a lower rise. The 1940′s suit has got a stronger shoulder, a niche waist and it’s longer — it just covers the butt. And so the gangster squad, all of their clothes, we made, because every change for those guys ended up having to need a double at some point. And so we built all the clothes for Josh, for Ryan, for Kennard [Robert Patrick], for Ramirez [Michael Pena], for Anthony Mackie’s character. And what we did was we would usually find something that was original, maybe a jacket or a pair of pants from another suit and we would tailor them to the actor, because everybody has different bodies and they’re movie stars and we wanted them to look good. A lot of the fabric came from overseas, from England, from Italy, because we were [looking] for like a textured wool, and then we manufactured it from L.A. tailors who are used to cranking out these large numbers of multiples. We made Josh’s hats, we made Ryan’s hats, and we made Sean Penn‘s hats. And everybody else’s hats we found in stock — there’s great costume houses in L.A. where we could find some really good originals, [but] you have to try a lot of hats on to get the one with the right crown and the right brim. So it was a lot of tailoring and a lot of manufacturing, and for Emma, we built all of her clothes.

CB: Who was the easiest to find a style that matched their personality or the personality of the character with that sort of period detail?

MZ: I thought not only were they enthusiastic and willing to get inside their character and the period, but everybody sort of listened to me when we were talking and prepping. You mentioned that all the men are built differently than they are, and we said try to lay off the heavy weights if you’re going to work out — work out like they did in those days with just push-ups, sit ups, pull-ups. Because you don’t want that big thick body in this time period, and everybody did that. And Josh had a great haircut and he looked great in his fedora, and to me, the minute he put his costume on he looked like he stepped out of the 1940s. And Ryan wears clothes really well. Michael Pena was just very open; he had never really done a period piece before, and it was a huge learning experience for him. Anthony Mackie has done some period work and he totally understood it – they were all so in to it.

CB: Ryan and Emma’s costumes say so much about their characters. How much participation did they have in their costumes, and how much were they reliant on you to sort of find costumes that were appropriate for their characters?

MZ: I think because they both were coming from very busy schedules — like Ryan was on another movie — they were very reliant on my research. I don’t know how to say this without sounding [full of myself], but I sort of guided them – like, this is the world that this movie is and this is how I see your character and how I see your costume. And they were really receptive to this idea and kind of just accepted it, because you have to remember I had been on the movie — not only have I done this time period, and this is my area of expertise, but I had been on it longer than they had. And so they accepted this way to sort of get in to this time period, get in to their character. Emma was like a sponge — she was totally receptive and wanted to know why and who’s and what’s. She was really cooperative. She had to wear undergarments like girdles and we really pinched in her waist. — she’s got such a nice figure, but she is built more contemporary than a girl from the ’40s is. So, we sucked her in like three inches on her waistline and gave her a little bit bigger bust line. She was totally in to it, and of course she has an opinion, but I think she and I [both] realize what works on her and what doesn’t, so it was a very good relationship.

CB: How about Ryan?

MZ: In the beginning, the audience doesn’t know whether [he’s] a gangster or a cop, you know, and neither does people that [he] hangs out with. And so he dresses a little bit more like a gangster and I also think he cares about his appearance and spends the majority of his income on clothes, whereas Josh’s character is much more utilitarian. Like in his mind, [Josh] went from an Army uniform to a cop uniform, and then now that he’s a detective his suit is a uniform. He had maybe five different suits that we put him in in the movie and they all kind of look alike, and that was intentional. Like he doesn’t want to think about his clothes, whereas Ryan’s character, every day he gets dressed and he’s much more dapper and cares about his appearance and he’s still trying to get a lady, too. There’s a comment in the beginning that not for a lack of trying, but he hasn’t had any action in a couple of weeks. So he’s going for it — he’s out every day, out on the town and trying to look as sharp as he possibly can. And then he has a bit of an arc, [because] as he gets more and more in to being a member of the gangster squad, he becomes a little bit more serious, like you’ll see him wear ties a little bit more often at work as opposed to just an open-collared shirt. That was an intentional arc for his character, just because he cares more — he’s trying to be a member of the squad and be more like what was considered appropriate for a detective to wear in those days.

CB: How feasible do you feel like it is for someone to be influenced by this and take that style now? Do you feel like there’s a way to sort of borrow that and bring it in to sort of a modern, the modern day?

MZ: Oh, absolutely. I think that if the guy was going to purchase some clothes, I think it’s a more formal outward appearance than some people have nowadays, I often think the 1940′s silhouette is quite flattering. So if they did go and purchase ’40s clothes, it’s an intention to tailoring because basically I think that’s what sets the ’40s silhouette apart from some other time periods — the shoulder fits, the waist fits, the sleeve length fits, the pants fit. It’s a formality and attention to tailoring and detail that it works in any time period I think.

CB: Do you have a favorite costume that you designed for this film, or even a favorite character that you worked?

MZ: I love Emma’s red dress — I have to say that red dress to me is a showstopper. I love the cream dress also that she wears when she catches Ryan breaking in to Mickey’s house, but it’s such a short scene you don’t really get a good glimpse at it. But I loved all of her clothes. And also there’s – there was a pimp in the movie that had a huge part got way cut down, but it was my first zoot suit that I ever designed and had built and that was a lot of fun. But I guess it’s Emma’s clothes I really enjoyed doing, just finding those gowns. It was fun because I didn’t copy an original design. That red gown was directly built from my sketch and it was very satisfying to see it go from an idea in my brain on to paper and then into a garment and then on to an actress’s body. To me that red dress is a showstopper. I think she looked fantastic in it and so I have to say that’s probably my favorite.

Which of the costumes in Celebuzz’ gallery is your favorite? Watch the Gangster Squad trailer and let us know what you thought of the stars’ style in the comments below!

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‘Tyler Perry’s Temptation’: Kim Kardashian Consults a Marriage Counselor (PHOTOS)

In Temptation, Tyler Perry teams up with Hollywood’s hottest gossip magnet, Kim Kardashian, to explore a subject tailor-made for melodrama: the challenges of holy matrimony.

Officially titled Tyler Perry’s Temptation: The Confessions of a Marriage Counselor, the film focuses on a couples therapist (Jurnee Smollett) whose professional and personal lives become increasingly complicated after she gets involved with one of her clients.

Celebuzz, meanwhile, has teamed up with Lionsgate to premiere the official one-sheet for the film, which is set for release March 29, 2013.

Click here to check out the film’s final poster as well as a handful of other images from the film.

Kardashian and Smollett are joined by a cast that includes Vanessa Williams, Brandy Norwood, Lance Gross and Robbie Jones among many others.

Although he wrote and directed the film, Perry himself does not appear on screen, suggesting that the auteur’s latest is more serious fare, a la Good Deeds or For Colored Girls.

Watch the trailer below for Tyler Perry’s Temptation, which opens March 29, 2013. And then let us know in the comments below: how eager are you to see Kim K. in a dramatic role on the silver screen?

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KIm Kardashian Teams With Tyler Perry for the Marriage Counselor Melodrama ‘Temptation’ (PHOTOS)

In Temptation, Tyler Perry teams up with Hollywood’s hottest gossip magnet, Kim Kardashian, to explore a subject tailor-made for melodrama: the challenges of holy matrimony.

Officially titled Tyler Perry’s Temptation, the film focuses on a couples therapist (Jurnee Smollett-Bell) whose professional and personal lives become increasingly complicated after she gets involved with one of her clients.

Celebuzz, meanwhile, has teamed up with Lionsgate to premiere the official one-sheet for the film, which is set for release March 29, 2013.

Click here to check out the film’s final poster as well as a handful of other images from the film.

Kardashian and Smollett are joined by a cast that includes Vanessa Williams, Brandy Norwood, Lance Gross and Robbie Jones among many others.

Although he wrote and directed the film, Perry himself does not appear on screen, suggesting that the auteur’s latest is more serious fare, a la Good Deeds or For Colored Girls.

Watch the trailer below for Tyler Perry’s Temptation, which opens March 29, 2013. And then let us know in the comments below: how eager are you to see Kim K. in a dramatic role on the silver screen?

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Teresa Palmer and Nicholas Hoult Make an Adorable Inter-Species Couple in ‘Warm Bodies’ (VIDEO)

Young Adult lit fans worried that Twilight’s Bella and Edward might be the movies’ last supernatural-fantasy couple can rest easy: Warm Bodies is set to be the next great romance featuring two characters not just from different walks of life, but different species.

In the upcoming film, Nicholas Hoult plays R, a zombie who takes a shine to Julie (Teresa Palmer), the girlfriend of one of his latest meals. The duo make an unlikely but unexpectedly charming pair after R brings her back to his lair, vowing to protect her from his brains-eating brethren even as he shows her the post-living world he’s created for himself in an abandoned airplane.

But in a new clip exclusive to Celebuzz, R and Julie find their burgeoning romance tested after the prejudices of others – namely, Julie’s father, General Grigio (John Malkovich) – threaten to keep them separated, permanently, by putting a couple of bullets into R’s undead head.

Audiences know Hoult from his turn as Hank McCoy, a/k/a Beast, in X-Men: First Class, while Palmer made a case for changing the name of I Am Number Four as the title character’s ass-kicking companion, Number Six. Writer-director Jonathan Levine wrung both comedy and drama out of the true-life story of a cancer patient’s efforts to fight off his disease in 50/50, after introducing himself to the world with the ‘90s-set dramedy The Wackness.

Watch Celebuzz’ exclusive clip for Warm Bodies, which breaks down the world and the characters within the film. And then let us know in the comments below – how excited are you for a new movie about forbidden love?

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Olivia Thirlby Says She Loved Playing Her ‘Dredd 3D’ Character ‘Not Just Because She Wears Leather and Is Blonde’ (Q&A)

Ingenues are a dime a dozen in Hollywood, but truly talented young actresses like Olivia Thirlby are a considerably rarer find. Since making her breakthrough as the title character’s sassy BFF in Jason Reitman’s Juno, Thirlby has found more and more interesting roles to tackle in films of all sizes. And in Dredd 3D, she finds herself at an interesting crossroads, exploring deep-rooted character details in a movie mostly designed to deliver visceral thrills.

Commanding the screen opposite Karl Urban (Star Trek), Thirlby proves she’s capable not only of holding her own in testosterone-fueled scenarios, but providing them with an emotional substance that gives the film as a whole greater meaning. The actress spoke with Celebuzz about her work in Dredd, and talked at length about finding the nuance and detail in the increasing variety of characters that she’s been able to play as her profile rises, and her talent develops.

Celebuzz: What was the initial appeal of this, and then what work did you have to do to make sure that she was a formidable companion to him because Dredd is sort of a monolith?

Olivia Thirlby: Well, it’s true that I am small and they put lifts in my shoes, but it still kept me a good solid foot shorter than Karl and Wood. But I approached Anderson as a role, not just as the chick in an action film. And that’s because really because Alex Garland wrote this amazing character who was a force to be reckoned with, and she was this amazingly strong, powerful woman who goes on a very complete journey and starts out in the one place and by the end of the film she seems almost to be a completely different person. So I can’t do anything about my height, as much as I maybe wish that I could. So instead, I think people’s power comes from something within them, moreso than it does from muscles and bones. And so that, I guess, was my goal with her.

CB: What did you do to get yourself acclimated to the idea that regardless of the fact that she may not be ideally suited for the job that she has, she clearly has gone through enough education and training that the challenges she faces are not unexpected?

OT: It’s definitely difficult for her. She was orphaned at a young age and I think that she probably witnessed a lot of injustice and crime in her young life, and has this very strong idealism about setting things right and being a force for good. So this very strong idealism is I think what she brings to the table and what can help make her feel not just like the comic relief, or a lot of female roles, not just in genre films, but in general, are like a little too good to be true. I read many roles for women that are hot enough to be models but also are motorcycle mechanics and also have PhD’s from Harvard. I’m not saying these people don’t exist, but I think the most interesting part of any character is what’s wrong with them, and I think that what’s wrong with Anderson is that despite everything that is going on inside of her, she is a bit tightly wound. And when we are trying that hard to prove yourself, you can never be yourself.

CB: She gets put through this meat grinder of a training program, but do you feel like she really wants to succeed in this, or has she just been brought up to expect that that’s what she should want?

OT: I think that if she didn’t want it so badly she probably wouldn’t be still there. I think it’s her lifelong dream and it comes from this strong ideology about good and bad and wanting to set things straight, and knowing that even in the worst slums there are good people that deserve better. And the reason why the odds are against her is because not only because she’s failed and she’s being given her very last chance, but because she can tell immediately that Dredd does not think she’s a worthy candidate. And he’s a very intimidating figure.

CB: Anderson is a character who is from the source material, but she doesn’t have the same iconic silhouette that Dredd does. How liberating and how challenging was it to create a character who in a very literal way is the human face of this movie?

OT: When I got into the comics and spent time with them, it was a relief to discover that Anderson doesn’t have quite as concretely solidified persona as Dredd does. And she does vary depending on who is writing her and drawing her, so it was liberating to find that unlike Karl who had these like gargantuan shoes that he had to fill perfectly, it was a little bit more unscripted, a little bit more up to me what I could do with the role, which was definitely liberating.

CB: What ultimately do you feel like this movie is about? Because it works beautifully from a visceral point of view, but what do you feel like is thematically underlying this adventure?

OT: I think at the end of the day the heart and soul of the film is the partnership between Dredd and Anderson that forms, and that has its ups and downs. There are times in the film when he hates her and as far as he’s concerned she’s failing, and there are times in the film when she does things that surprise him, and then there are times when they’re on equal ground and they’re partners. The special thing about Dredd and Anderson is that because of her abilities, she’s the only person probably who’s ever existed who knows what’s going on in Dredd’s mind, who knows actually what he feels, which is something that no one’s supposed to know. So he I think at first he really hates her for that, and in the end it becomes something that is a strength between them and I think what this movie is about is this totalitarian justice system that on paper it needs to function in black and white, but the idea that it’s not black and white. That there needs to be somebody who’s thinking, who’s not just ticking boxes, who’s not just doing what they’re told, who’s not just following rules. There needs to be somebody at some point who’s thinking critically, who’s making their own decision, who’s assessing the situation and actually doing what’s right, not just on paper but in the world. So I think that the heart of the movie lies there and I think that that’s what Anderson teaches Dredd.

CB: You talk about some female characters being too good to be true, but sadly there are too many female characters who are just not good enough for actresses to be able to really explore. How difficult is it to find or to create characters from the material that’s out there that you feel like really challenge you?

OT: Yeah. I mean, there’s so much out there, and when there’s sheer volume of stuff, only a percentage of it is going to be exceptional, and it’s certainly harder to find a really good strong material than it is to find weaker material. But it doesn’t mean it’s not out there. There are people like Alex Garland who when they sit down to craft a story, even if it’s a genre film, even if it’s from a comic book, they think deeply about the humanity behind those stories and they craft characters that have a place to start and a place to finish and have a journey in between, and have flaws and strengths and all those kinds of things. So it’s just a matter of hoping that the people that generate this material continue to do so and then hoping that at some point something finds its way into your hands.

CB: How much do you feel like genre material in particular has really given you some opportunities? Are you finding that now the be it in the process of adaptation of that material or just in the creation of it that there are being more well-rounded kinds of female characters?

OT: Well, I think actually the whole culture is trending towards interesting women and flawed women. With the existence of Tina Fey and Kristen Wigg and Lena Dunham and everyone in between, I’m excited to be witnessing what seems to be the culture at large beginning to care about the female point of view. It seems to be actually quite an exciting time for that. And if your question is just in terms of genre stuff, I can’t say that I read enough of it to be the authority on it, but I can say that [my] character is awesome, and not just because she wears leather and is blonde. It doesn’t come along every day and I feel really honored that it got to be me to play her.

Watch the trailer for Dredd 3D below. The film is being released on 2- and 3D Blu-ray Tuesday, January 8. Let us know what you think of Olivia and the film itself, in the comments section below!

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Brad Pitt Washes Hands for Pontius Pilate Role

Brad Pitt may be about to step into the role of one of history’s most hated leaders. The actor is in talks to play Pontius Pilate, the Roman military hero whose political aspirations landed him the responsibility of approving the crucifixion of Christ, according to Deadline. Pilate is often considered little more than a Biblical villain, but Pitt and Warner Bros. seem to think there’s a deeper story to be told.

Deadline reviewed a draft of the film’s script by writer Vera Blasi, saying:

“Blasi’s script reads almost like a Biblical era Twilight Zone episode in which a proud, capable Roman soldier gets in way over his head. His arrogance and inability to grasp the devoutness of the citizenry and its hatred for the Roman occupiers and their pagan gods leads him to make catastrophic decisions. All of this puts him in a desperate situation and in need of public approval when he is asked to decide the fate of a 33-year old rabbi accused by religious elders of claiming he is King of the Jews.”

Pitt hasn’t officially signed on for this historical epic, but a deal seems likely. The depressingly handsome-slash-talented actor will next be seen in zombie thriller World War Z.

Watch the trailer for Pitt’s latest film, Killing Them Softly. And then let us know — what do you think of the actor taking on the Biblical character in a future film?

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JGL Goes From Gotham… to ‘Sin City’

When last we saw Joseph Gordon-Levitt, he was aping a young Bruce Willis as a tough-as-nails, time-traveling hitman in Looper. Turns out, he might be teaming with him yet again in the Sin City sequel A Dame to Kill For.

Contrary to expectations that Gordon-Levitt has embarked on a new career playing the younger version of Willis in every movie in which the veteran appears, the young actor will join the cast as a character new to the Sin City universe, playing an over-confident gambler named Johnny seeking to destroy his underworld nemesis. Sin City: A Dame to Kill For combines two of Frank Miller’s classic stories – A Dame to Kill For and Just Another Saturday Night – with two completely original tales of crime and betrayal.

With Batman’s protégé joining the cast, and Bruce Willis presumably retaking the role of the grizzled P.I. John Hartigan, who else will be roaming those striking, black-and-white streets?

Confirmed to return are original cast members Mickey Rourke as Marv, Jessica Alba as Nancy, Rosario Dawson as Gail, and Jaime King as Goldie/Wendy. Also rumored to return, but as of yet unconfirmed, are Clive Owen as Dwight and Michael Madsen as Bob.

New cast members include Dennis Haysbert as Manute (replacing the late Michael Clarke Duncan) and Jamie Chung as Miho.

More casting is expected soon.

“I love how the first movie uses VFX, not to make fake things look real, but to create a heightened world unburdened by the look and feel of reality,” says Gordon-Levitt about joining the ensemble. “Plus, nobody makes a badass like Mr. Rodriguez.”

The follow-up was scripted by comic-creator Frank Miller and writer William Monahan (The Departed).

If you need further examples of Gordon-Levitt’s versatility and talent, watch his appearance on Saturday Night Live earlier this year, where he performed a Magic Mike-themed opening number. And let us know in the comments below — what do you think of Gordon-Levitt joining the cast of Sin City 2?

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‘Texas Chainsaw 3D’: The ‘Stupid, Lazy and Boring’ Horror Reboot That Conquered at the Box Office (VIDEO)

As Celebuzz reported Sunday, Texas Chainsaw 3D took the top spot at the box officer over the weekend of January 7, earning more than $23 million as it outpaced holiday performers such as Django Unchained and The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.

But no matter how much money the film took in, it’s not the sort of “entertainment” – even in a “dump month” like January – which does anything unique or interesting enough to earn the commercial success it has enjoyed thus far.

Specifically, it’s a remarkably misguided new installment of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre franchise which lacks scares, narrative cohesion or even the benefit of basic logic. Stupid, lazy and boring, Texas Chainsaw 3D is so bad it boggles the mind how or why Lionsgate considered it suitable to be released as a real feature film. [Warning: Spoilers below.]

On a basic story level, the film literally makes no sense: TC3D opens at the end of the original film, which was made and set in 1974, focuses on a (possibly) 20 to 25-year-old woman who was a baby at that time, and yet inexplicably the new film takes place in 2012.

Oddly, the opening scenes feature plenty of period detail to thoroughly confirm that ‘70s setting, and yet the characters use technology that could not exist anywhere except in the present. (Late in the film, a police officer uses Facetime on his iPhone to provide streaming video for his superiors as he investigates a potential crime scene.)

Meanwhile, the premise of the film is that this same female character, Heather (Alexandra Daddario), is related to the Sawyer family – whose black-sheep son is none other than Leatherface (Dan Yeager). When she receives an unexpected inheritance from a distant relative, she travels down to Texas to find out about her “real” family, and its many dark secrets. What she soon discovers is that her family has effectively been engaged in a twisted, decades-old conflict with the Hartman clan, and she’s the catalyst for that battle to begin anew.

Despite this familial conflict, the first two-thirds of the film are devoted to the perfunctory rhythms of Leatherface chasing and killing Heather and her friends. The big problem with this is that (1) none of the murders are executed with any style or suspense and (2) the twentysomething protagonists we’re supposed to care about are the stupidest, most unlikeable characters even in a rich and colorful history of stupid, unlikeable horror movie characters.

Heather manages not only to trip over a 12-inch “fence,” but she falls with a regularity that approaches parody – at least three or four times as she’s running from her attacker. Meanwhile, her boyfriend and best friend cheat on her with one another, and then they are summarily killed by Leatherface before this information is ever revealed to Heather, making it an entirely worthless plot development except to intensify the audience’s growing exasperation with them before they’re executed.

Moreover, add in a black sheriff who has held his job for 20- or 40 or however many years and somehow is entirely powerless whenever a local businessman decides that he wants to exact his own brand of redneck justice, and a final-act twist in which we’re supposed to sympathize with, you guessed it, Leatherface instead of his victims.

All of it adds up to a spectacularly nonsensical and mind-numbing experience which not only betrays the raw visceral energy of the original film, but even the margins of what constitutes tolerable horror moviemaking in an age of derivative sequels, remakes and spinoffs. Texas Chainsaw 3D is not just a bad horror movie, it’s a bad any kind of movie.

Watch Celebuzz’ interview with Alexandra Daddario and Trey Songz below, and let us know — did you see the film? If so, what did you think?

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‘Texas Chainsaw 3D’: The ‘Stupid, Lazy and Boring’ Horror Reboot That Conquered at the Box Office (VIDEO)

As Celebuzz reported Sunday, Texas Chainsaw 3D took the top spot at the box officer over the weekend of January 7, earning more than $23 million as it outpaced holiday performers such as Django Unchained and The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.

But no matter how much money the film took in, it’s not the sort of “entertainment” – even in a “dump month” like January – which does anything unique or interesting enough to earn the commercial success it has enjoyed thus far.

Specifically, it’s a remarkably misguided new installment of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre franchise which lacks scares, narrative cohesion or even the benefit of basic logic. Stupid, lazy and boring, Texas Chainsaw 3D is so bad it boggles the mind how or why Lionsgate considered it suitable to be released as a real feature film. [Warning: Spoilers below.]

On a basic story level, the film literally makes no sense: TC3D opens at the end of the original film, which was made and set in 1974, focuses on a (possibly) 20 to 25-year-old woman who was a baby at that time, and yet inexplicably the new film takes place in 2012.

Oddly, the opening scenes feature plenty of period detail to thoroughly confirm that ‘70s setting, and yet the characters use technology that could not exist anywhere except in the present. (Late in the film, a police officer uses Facetime on his iPhone to provide streaming video for his superiors as he investigates a potential crime scene.)

Meanwhile, the premise of the film is that this same female character, Heather (Alexandra Daddario), is related to the Sawyer family – whose black-sheep son is none other than Leatherface (Dan Yeager). When she receives an unexpected inheritance from a distant relative, she travels down to Texas to find out about her “real” family, and its many dark secrets. What she soon discovers is that her family has effectively been engaged in a twisted, decades-old conflict with the Hartman clan, and she’s the catalyst for that battle to begin anew.

Despite this familial conflict, the first two-thirds of the film are devoted to the perfunctory rhythms of Leatherface chasing and killing Heather and her friends. The big problem with this is that (1) none of the murders are executed with any style or suspense and (2) the twentysomething protagonists we’re supposed to care about are the stupidest, most unlikeable characters even in a rich and colorful history of stupid, unlikeable horror movie characters.

Heather manages not only to trip over a 12-inch “fence,” but she falls with a regularity that approaches parody – at least three or four times as she’s running from her attacker. Meanwhile, her boyfriend and best friend cheat on her with one another, and then they are summarily killed by Leatherface before this information is ever revealed to Heather, making it an entirely worthless plot development except to intensify the audience’s growing exasperation with them before they’re executed.

Moreover, add in a black sheriff who has held his job for 20- or 40 or however many years and somehow is entirely powerless whenever a local businessman decides that he wants to exact his own brand of redneck justice, and a final-act twist in which we’re supposed to sympathize with, you guessed it, Leatherface instead of his victims.

All of it adds up to a spectacularly nonsensical and mind-numbing experience which not only betrays the raw visceral energy of the original film, but even the margins of what constitutes tolerable horror moviemaking in an age of derivative sequels, remakes and spinoffs. Texas Chainsaw 3D is not just a bad horror movie, it’s a bad any kind of movie.

Watch Celebuzz’ interview with Alexandra Daddario and Trey Songz below, and let us know — did you see the film? If so, what did you think?

Celebuzz Single Player No Autoplay (CORE)
No changes are to be made to this player